• White Facebook Icon
  • White LinkedIn Icon

Office: 916.368.9181

Fax: 916.368.1308

©2019 BY QUINCY ENGINEERING, INC.

Three Quincy Projects Recognized by APWA Northern California Chapter and CEAC

March 21, 2019

Three Quincy projects recently received recognition by the APWA Northern California Chapter and CEAC.

Balfour Road/SR4 Interchange, Contra Costa Transportation Authority

APWA NorCal Transportation Award (Projects $25M to $75M)

Quincy Engineering developed the Project Study Report/Project Report, and PS&E package as well as provided construction support for the construction of 0.75 miles of new freeway and a grade-separated interchange at State Route 4 and Balfour Road in the City of Brentwood. This interchange replaces an at-grade intersection and includes the construction of several bridge and retaining wall structures, utility relocation, drainage facilities, and traffic signals.

Canyon Road Landslide Repair, Town of Moraga

APWA NorCal Disaster or Emergency(Projects $25M to $75M)

Due to significant storm events in the winter and spring of 2017, a slide occurred along Canyon Road in the Town of Moraga. The road provides residents access to the town and an alternative commute route from Moraga to Oakland. Quincy prepared PS&E packages for the removal of the existing bridge, as well as the construction of a temporary bridge and a retaining wall. The retaining wall consisted of a 44-foot-long CIDH stitch pile wall. The temporary bridge, which was placed on CIDH pile shafts, was 150 feet long. This project was completed on time and reopened to the public shortly before Thanksgiving that same year.

Brookwood Drive Bridge over Jacoby Creek Rehabilitation/Restoration Project, Humboldt County

CEAC Efficient and Sustainable Bridge Maintenance, Construction and Reconstruction Honorable Mention

Quincy Engineering inspected and prepared a Bridge Condition Assessment and Load Rating Analysis for the Brookwood Drive Bridge over Jacoby Creek in Humboldt County. Although the bridge was well-designed and well-constructed for its context, it did not have the adequate structural capacity to carry the heavier loads of modern design code, and the narrow width of the bridge required designation and signage as a single-lane bridge. After approval by the County, Quincy prepared the PS&E package for rehabilitation of the bridge which included structural repair details, replacement of the handrail to meet current code standards, timber bridge fumigation specifications, and a temporary detour bridge for vehicles and a pedestrian during construction and fumigation operations.